Begin to See: Photographers of Black Mountain College

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Photo by Harry Callahan

Although Black Mountain College no longer exists, the Black Mountain College Museum + Art Center continues to celebrate that unique community of artists in Asheville, NC. A current exhibit, Begin to See, features photography by artists who are best known in other media. The list includes: Josef Albers, Hazel Larsen Archer, Josef Breitenbach, Harry Callahan, Trude Guermonprez, Robert Haas, Clemens Kalischer, Barbara Morgan, Beaumont Newhall, Nancy Newhall, Andy Oates, Robert Rauschenberg, Aaron Siskind, Cy Twombly, Stan VanDerBeek, Susan Weil, and Jonathan Williams. If you’re in Asheville this spring, perhaps check out these related events, as well as the exhibition.

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The Fringe of Symmetry

I found this videopoem through my friend Laura Mullen, who posted it on facebook. The video is inspired by the poem “Going West” by Maurice Gee. The video is sponsored by the New Zealand Book Council. Fasten your reader’s seat belt.

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Credits: Film for NZ Book Council
Produced by Colenso BBDO and
Animated by Andersen M Studio

Never-ending Polaroid

Never-ending Polaroid from Threadless.com on Vimeo.

From the threadless website:

Bob Nanna: "Never Ending Polaroid" @ the Threadless Chicago Gallery

During his "Never Ending Polaroid" project, Threadless staffer Bob
Nanna has collected 500+ snapshots of various people including Steve
Albini, Kim Deal, Mark Kozelek, Jack McBrayer, Fugazi, Jimmy Eat World,
Blink 182, Shirley Manson, Butch Vig, Jeremy Enigk, and Ron Sexsmith,
among others. On view for the first time since its induction, the
collection of photos will be displayed chronologically around the
gallery. This project is ongoing and will continue to grow after
leaving the Threadless Gallery.

See the Voice: Visible Verse 2008

Visible verse logoPacific Cinémathèque and curator Heather Haley are seeking videopoem
submissions from around the world for the annual Visible Verse
screening and performance poetry celebration. Visible Verse is North
America’s sustaining venue for the presentation of new and artistically
significant videopoetry.

Official guidelines:

Visible Verse seeks videopoems, with a 15 minutes maximum duration.
* Either official language of Canada is acceptable, though if the video
is in French, an English-dubbed or-subtitled version is required for
consideration. Videos may originate in any part of the world, however.
* Pieces will be judged on true literary merit. The ideal videopoem is
a wedding of word and image, the voice seen as well as heard.
* Please, do not send documentaries, as they are outside the featured genre.
* Videopoem producers should provide a brief bio, full name, and
contact information in a cover letter. There is no official application
form nor entry fee.
* Submission deadline is 1 September, 2008.

The ideal videopoem is a wedding of word and image, the voice seen as well as heard.
*Please, do not send documentaries, as they are outside the featured genre.
*Videopoem producers should provide a brief bio, full name, and contact information in a cover letter. There is no official application form nor entry
fee.

Submission deadline is 1 September, 2008. Send, at your own risk, videopo=
ems and poetry films/preview copies (which cannot be returned) in DVD format to: VISIBLE VERSE c/o Pacific CinE9mathE8que, 200–1131 Howe Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z 2L7, Canada. Selected artists will be notified by 1 October, 2008 and receive a screening fee. The Visible Verse 2008 will be held on November 6, 2008, with a screening and performance poetry celebration in Vancouver. For more information contact Heather Haley

Vancouver’s Pacific CinEmathEque Pacifique is a not-for-profit society dedicated to the understanding of film and moving images.

ZOBOP! at MoMA

Watch Jim Lambie’s dream become real in this video.

From the MoMA website:

Color Chart celebrates a paradox: the lush beauty that results
when contemporary artists assign color decisions to chance, readymade
source, or arbitrary system. Midway through the twentieth century,
long-held convictions regarding the spiritual truth or scientific
validity of particular colors gave way to an excitement about color as
a mass-produced and standardized commercial product. The Romantic quest
for personal expression instead became Andy Warhol’s "I want to be a
machine;" the artistry of mixing pigments was eclipsed by Frank
Stella’s "Straight out of the can; it can’t get better than that."

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Color Chart
is the first major exhibition devoted to this pivotal transformation,
featuring work by some forty artists ranging from Ellsworth Kelly and
Gerhard Richter to Sherrie Levine and Damien Hirst.

(Thanks, Jack and Long, for this one!)